Chicago Boyz

                 
 
 
 

Recommended Photo Store
What Are Chicago Boyz Readers Reading? Click here to find out.
 
Make your Amazon purchases though this banner to support this blog:
 
  •   Problem? Question?
  •   Contact Contributors:
  •   Please send any comments or suggestions about America 3.0 to:

  • CB Twitter Feed
  • Lex's Tweets
  • Jonathan's Tweets
  • Blog Posts (RSS 2.0)
  • Blog Posts (Atom 0.3)
  • Incoming Links
  • Recent Comments

    • Loading...
  • Authors

  • Notable Discussions

  • Recent Posts

  • Blogroll

  • Categories

  • Archives

  • Wave Of The Future

    Posted by James R. Rummel on January 24th, 2011 (All posts by )

    One of the big topics of discussions in the right side of the blogosphere lately has been how the pay and benefits of public employees has contributed to the current fiscal emergency our nation now faces. Of particular interest is how unfunded pensions are causing a budget crises every fiscal year.

    The Buckeye Institute, which the local news media dubbed a “conservative think tank” here in Ohio, has a searchable database that lists the salary of every public school teacher in this state. They even go so far as to include the estimated pensions that the educators have coming.

    This will probably become something that every state will have, and it has been a long time coming.

     

    3 Responses to “Wave Of The Future”

    1. rmark Says:

      If money is fungible, then isn’t all the other spending done in the past also part of the problem, not just retiree pensions?

    2. Boobah Says:

      The problem with pensions is that while the promises to pay were made in the past, most of the actual paying is done now.

    3. Jim Miller Says:

      In the late 1970s, the Des Moines Register published the names and salaries of every teacher in Des Moines.

      In Australia, newspapers regularly publish the grades of college students. (I think there is a strong argument for publishing those grades here — if the student is receiving a government scholarship or loan.)

      In Norway, citizens (and, I suppose, non-citizens) can look up the income tax returns for everyone who files.

      So there are a few precedents worth thinking about.