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  • How to Fold a Suit

    Posted by Dan from Madison on February 18th, 2012 (All posts by )

    Knowledge you can use, via LifeHacker:

     

    12 Responses to “How to Fold a Suit”

    1. carl from chicago Says:

      That is a cool video. I was old school for years with the hanging bag but now no one brings them anymore so I need to learn how to fold a suit and shirt like that. For shirts I should just have a bunch laying around where the dry cleaner gives them to me folded, but I never knew how to do the suit right. I also need to get some of those bigger ziplock bags.

    2. Bill Brandt Says:

      That man is obviously a pro of many years…didn’t even know you could fold a suit without ruining the creases/

    3. Lexington Green Says:

      He makes it look easy. I always respect and admire practical, physical skills like this. Once the whole economy was composed of people who each knew hundreds of tricks of the trade.

    4. J. Scott Shipman Says:

      This a great video! I folded mine just this way when I was always on the road. Nice refresher, as I’m headed for London in March. Many thanks!

    5. Dan from Madison Says:

      “He makes it look easy. I always respect and admire practical, physical skills like this. Once the whole economy was composed of people who each knew hundreds of tricks of the trade.”

      By saying “once” you imply that it doesn’t anymore. You would be correct, at least measured from the tiny fishbowl I work in, HVAC mechanics.

      So many of the old guys are getting out of it, and very few young people want to enter the trades. So at times, when I bring up a solution to my counter for a technician that isn’t part for part, I get a lot of quizzical looks from the new breed. They are amazed that I could come up with a solution but I am always quick to point out that I didn’t come up with anything, just remembered what an old guy told me ten years ago (I remember anything that makes me money).

      But many times these solutions are rejected and this ends up costing the end user more money.

      In general, the trades are screwed in a while. Note the age of the guy in the video. I am guessing at least 50 – I highly doubt he will ever be in need for a job if he is as good a tailor as I suspect from his ease handling that suit – he probably remembered that from his days “in back”. So his job is secure, but in the long run, our society is going to be in a tough position for tradespeople if something doesn’t change.

    6. Dan from Madison Says:

      I should add that this could be a huge money and time saver if you are a someone who travels a lot and needs a suit and are on short trips. Now that the airlines are charging for luggage, if you can slide with carry on and avoiding the luggage carousels in the airport these savings can add up fast.

    7. Gerry From Valpo Says:

      Good information, thanks. It will prove quite valuable when I own a suit.

    8. Lexington Green Says:

      I was a short order cook one Summer. It was hard work, and extremely high stress. The old guys knew lots of tricks and shortcuts to get the food out fast and looking good. This guy reminds me of them.

    9. Jonathan Says:

      So many of the old guys are getting out of it, and very few young people want to enter the trades.

      Part of what’s going on may be that increases in productivity have given talented people more and better options than they used to have. The most able people are now more likely to go into higher-paying fields than to become HVAC mechanics or tailors. This is similar to what’s happened in primary education as economic opportunities elsewhere have opened up for women. On the whole everyone is probably better off even though the quality of basic services may have declined.

    10. Dan from Madison Says:

      Can’t disagree with that Jonathan, but with the enormous installed base of equipment out there, the lack of trained techs will end up costing some folks more in the future.

    11. Lexington Green Says:

      There may be a business opportunity to train people. Make videos, like Khan Academy of all the old guys and capture as many of the tricks as possible. Use the videos as teaser trailers for in person instruction.

    12. Points And Figures Says:

      part of the problem is that some skill is commoditized. who buys a tailored suit anymore? you can buy them in asia but I find the quality to be substandard to a real tailored suit you pay $2500 for at a place like Oxxford.

      But, if you really want a good suit, you’ll pay up for quality tailoring. I have had my suits five years and they look as good as new. Let them out a bit, and then lost 30 lbs and brought them in.