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  • Interesting Data on the Persistence of Culture

    Posted by David Foster on June 16th, 2013 (All posts by )

    Suppose you had historical information from the 1300s showing in which German cities pogroms had occurred…and in which German cities pogroms had not occurred.

    Would you think this data would be of any use in predicting the levels of anti-Semitic activity in various localities in the 1920s thru 1940s….almost six hundred years later?

    This study suggests that the answer is “yes.”

    (Full paper available on SSRN, here.)

     

     

    2 Responses to “Interesting Data on the Persistence of Culture”

    1. ErisGuy Says:

      Are our lives limited by the persistence of occult powers which shape us in ways which we do not understand?

      Charlatans proclaim the discovery of occult forces (“vast, formless things,” and that their revelations will transform society. Two of them, collectively known as Marxism and psychiatry, have untold damage, promoted harmful delusions, and continue to wreck destruction on all peoples everywhere. The scientific project is the discovery—and then manipulation—of occult powers, but when its methods are transferred to humanity, the terrible effects of sociology and psychology demonstrate the hollowness of applying “reason” to man.

      Or should we just shrug, and say, “Eh, it’s culture.”

    2. Jonathan Says:

      Are our lives limited by the persistence of occult powers which shape us in ways which we do not understand?

      Perhaps it would be most accurate to say that there is increasing evidence of the cultural and biological heritabilty of individual behavior.