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  • The policeman’s story from Ferguson, Mo

    Posted by Michael Kennedy on October 14th, 2014 (All posts by )

    A caller to a radio show has described officer Darren Wilson’s version of the attack by Michael Brown. It pretty much follows what we know now.

    CNN said it verified with its police department sources that the story Josie told on the radio was the same as Wilson’s version of events. CNN called the stories an exact match.

    First, we know that Brown had robbed a convenience store and manhandled the clerk shortly before the shooting.

    Second, we know that the Holder DoJ tried to suppress the video.

    Next we know about the race hustlers coming to town and stirring up racism by many outsiders.

    The crowd was “peaceful and jovial” the Post-Dispatch informs us, and dotted with people who had traveled long distances. “Antonio Cuffee, 30, drove 13 hours from Baltimore with six others to join in the protests,” we are told. “‘We felt we had to come out here to be part of change,’ Cuffee, a policy worker, said. ‘It’s a shame so many black people are getting killed by police,’ he said. ‘Just by the nature of being black we are targeted, we are suspect.’”

    This, of course, is nonsense as most murders of black men are by other black men.

    The story told by the officer’s friend is as follows.

    Wilson said 18-year-old Michael Brown and his friend Dorian Johnson were walking in the middle of the street, so Wilson pulled up in his patrol car and told them, “Come on guys, get out of the street,” but they refused, saying they were almost at their destination.

    He kept rolling beside them and they cursed at him. He finally pulled over, at which point Josie said she believes he called for backup.

    “He pulled up ahead of them. And he was watching them, and then he got a call-in that there was a strong-arm robbery,” she said. That was the convenience-store robbery shown on surveillance tapes of Brown grabbing a handful of cigars and pushing a clerk away when Brown and Johnson left without paying.

    The pair matched the description of the robbers, and also appeared to be holding cigars.

    This was the moment when the event began to spin out of control.

    “So he goes in reverse back to them. Tries to get out of his car. They slam his door shut violently. I think he said Michael did,” Josie said. “And then he opened his car again. He tries to get out. And as he stands up, Michael just bum-rushes him, just shoves him back into his car, punches him in the face. And then Darren grabs for his gun. Michael grabs the gun, at one point he’s got the gun turned totally against his hip. And Darren shoves it away, and the gun goes off.”

    Brown and Johnson then ran, Josie said, and got about 35 feet away.

    “Darren’s first protocol is to pursue. So, he stands up and yells, ‘Freeze!’ Michael and his friend turn around. And Michael starts taunting him, ‘Oh, what are you going to do about it? You’re not going to shoot me.’ And then he said all the sudden he just started to bum-rush him. He just started coming at him full speed. And so he just started shooting. And he just kept coming. So, he really thinks he was on something because he just kept coming.”

    This sounds reasonable to me. The rest of the story is at the link.

    Why the virulent racism and riots by blacks ?

    A commenter at Ann Althouse’s blog suggests a cause. It was a link to this article about police funding small towns with traffic fines.

    St Louis County has an amazing number of small communities that use minor offense fines as revenue. This practice especially impacts the poor who are disproportionately black.

    The officer found that Bolden had four arrest warrants in three separate jurisdictions: the towns of Florissant and Hazelwood in St. Louis County and the town of Foristell in St. Charles County. All of the warrants were for failure to appear in court for traffic violations. Bolden hadn’t appeared in court because she didn’t have the money. A couple of those fines were for speeding, one was for failure to wear her seatbelt and most of the rest were for what defense attorneys in the St. Louis area have come to call “poverty violations”

    The article is long but worth reading. These small towns run “speed traps,” as we used to call them, and use other minor violations to fund their budgets. This is annoying to middle class drivers but devastating to the poor.

    Stories like Bolden’s abound across the St. Louis area. And despite the efforts of the ArchCity Defenders and legal aid clinics like those at Saint Louis University and Washington University, the vast majority of the people swept up into the St. Louis County municipal court system don’t have attorneys to inform them of their rights or to negotiate with judges and prosecutors.

    There are 90 municipalities in St. Louis County, and more in the surrounding counties. All but a few have their own police force, mayor, city manager and town council, and 81 have their own municipal court. To put that into perspective, consider Jackson County, Mo., which surrounds Kansas City. It is geographically larger than St. Louis County and has about two-thirds the population. Yet Jackson County has just 19 municipalities, and just 15 municipal courts — less than a quarter of municipalities and courts in St. Louis County.

    This is clearly an unhealthy situation but not one that is improved by rioting and arson. I live in Orange County, California, an area that also has many small cities, several of which have been caught manipulating the red light intervals to collect fines. Still the county cities have contracted with the County Sheriff for most of the police services and two large County court buildings serve most of the population of the southern part of the County. The St Louis situation sounds abusive and corrupt but it does not justify the rioting and threats toward the officer.

     

    One Response to “The policeman’s story from Ferguson, Mo”

    1. Michael Hiteshew Says:

      The racism is stirred up for political reasons. It keeps blacks down, dependent on the government since they become incapable of integrating into the larger society due to resentment, and so voting democrat. It’s that simple. The fact there are so many innocent Americans who become victims is irrelevant to them. Money and power, baby, that’s all they care about.