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  • C-SPAN 1 & 2 (times e.t.)

    Posted by Ginny on April 22nd, 2005 (All posts by )

    Book TV Schedule. C-SPAN 1 schedule. This week’s After Words and Q&A.

    On C-SPAN 1, Lamb Q[uestions] & Dexter Filkins A[nswers] (8:00 p.m. and again 11:00).

    Dexter Filkins talks about his reporting in Iraq and U.S. military action there. He’s been the Baghdad Correspondent for the New York Times since October 2003. Later this month, he’ll receive the George Polk Award for War Reporting for his first-hand account of an eight-day attack on Iraqi insurgents in Fallujah in November 2004.

    The transcript and streaming video of last week’s interview with Thomas Sowell is available on the Q&A page as well.

    C-Span 2’s highlights and full schedule.

    On After Words Sun at 6:00 and 9:00 pm, Jorge Ramos is interviewed by Linda Chavez.

    Jorge Ramos, co-anchor for Noticiero Univision News. . . .discusses his latest book, “Dying to Cross: The Worst Immigrant Tragedy in American History.” It’s the story behind the 19 Mexican immigrants who died while illegally crossing the American border in May 2003. The guest interviewer is Linda Chavez, president of the Center for Equal Opportunity, a public policy research organization.

    At midnight on Saturday, last week’s After Words interview (of Bob Dole by Rick Atkinson) is rerun. (Archives).

    Right now much seems “under construction.” When available, these links should work.

    Next weekend:
    May 1’s “In-depth” on C-Span 2 is going to devote three hours to Thomas Friedman; A&L links to a review of Friedman’s last book, The World Is Flat. (The review is not charitable; I’ve always enjoyed his ability to clarify with framing metaphors, though he clearly is not always able to distinguish between his boyish, energetic affection and his opinions (or conventional wisdom) and actual knowledge. He does not come off as an elitist (even though his understanding of both Central Europe & the central US are those of an inbred bi-coastalist). I guess I’m just a sucker for energy. Powerline is not.

    The L.A. Times Festival of the Books will be the site for much of next week’s BookTV.