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  • Belated New Year’s Notes To Self

    Posted by Jonathan on January 11th, 2019 (All posts by )

    Minimize paper, phone calls, driving, errands, quarrels, litigation, surgery.

    Maximize time with loved ones and time alone.

    Nobody’s that good.

    Most things aren’t your problem.

    Most predictions are wrong. Arguing about predictions is usually a waste of time.

    Arguing about anything, unless you are paid to do it, is usually a waste of time. An exception to this generalization is when you have a chance to make a principled case about an important issue in front of an audience with many uncommitted members.

    Most advice is worthless and should be taken with a grain or twenty of salt. However, an unexpected gentle suggestion from someone who knows you well should be treated seriously.

    Most loose ends should be left alone.

    Silence is often the best reply.

    Embrace the power of “I don’t know”.

    If it’s stupid and it works it isn’t stupid.

    Risk is everywhere and many endeavors are riskier than they initially appear to be. Complacency, especially in groups and institutions – “That’s never happened” – is a warning to watch out for icebergs.

    In business, look for patterns of events that contradict an opinion consensus.

    The period of chaos following a disruptive event can be a good time to take bold action.

    Everyone thinks his way is the only way. Try to learn from other people while keeping an open mind.
     

     

    7 Responses to “Belated New Year’s Notes To Self”

    1. yara Says:

      The two most abundant elements in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity.

      The most successful computer virus is the Unix operating system.

    2. Anonymous Says:

      Bravo, Jonathan.

      Death6

    3. Bill Brandt Says:

      All good except the last one – the more reflective know there is usually more than one way

    4. CapitalistRoader Says:

      Before the first of the year I sent out an email to friends saying that I’m filtering out all emails of which I’m a blind copy recipient. It worked. I have much less inflammatory, political emails in my inbox now. No need to argue with friends over political crap. I won’t change their minds and they won’t change mine, so what’s the point?

    5. Grurray Says:

      Regarding risk is everywhere, I have been following Jocko Willink for about the past year or two ago. If you’ve seen him on Twitter then you know that he usually posts short motivational videos at the beginning of the week. He had a rather good one this past week, if it’s quiet you have to assume the enemy is maneuvering and trying to set up on you.

    6. Lex Says:

      Good post.

      Avoiding useless arguments also means avoiding social media, which i have done, to the great benefit of my mental health and even my physical health.

    7. Bill Brandt Says:

      Mostly good points.

      As Lex said about social media and arguments, what an exasperating endeavor.

      Most predictions are wrong. Arguing about predictions is usually a waste of time.
      It is funny to read predictions in magazines of 20 years ago…and more.

      Arguing about anything, unless you are paid to do it, is usually a waste of time. An exception to this generalization is when you have a chance to make a principled case about an important issue in front of an audience with many uncommitted members.
      the overwhelming majority of people think their way is the only way

      In business, look for patterns of events that contradict an opinion consensus.
      that is very difficult. Most great changers seem to “come out of nowhere”

      The period of chaos following a disruptive event can be a good time to take bold action.

      Yes and no. All these great stock buys I made after the ’87 crash? Meh.

      Everyone thinks his way is the only way. Try to learn from other people while keeping an open mind.

      YES!