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    New! – Your Mildly Anxious Pre-Election Tech-Grouch Haikus

    Posted by Jonathan on 5th November 2018 (All posts by )

    Elections coming.
    Bad or worse – not good or bad –
    Is the real question.

    —-

    New Google inbox
    Maximizes confusion.
    But, Google knows best.

    —-

    Social media:
    People at each other’s throats
    Over little things.

    —-

    That damned noise again. . .
    Some app, can’t ID which one.
    This is the future?

    —-

    (Feel free to add your contributions in the comments.)
     

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    Posted in Poetry, Politics, Society, Tech | 9 Comments »

    Posted by Jonathan on 20th October 2018 (All posts by )

    jump and/or crawl in

    Test the intellectual waters with the Chicagoboyz

     

    Posted in Photos | 2 Comments »

    Seth Barrett Tillman: Senator Elizabeth Warren & Three E-mails Sent With No Response

    Posted by Jonathan on 17th October 2018 (All posts by )

    [START: #1]
     
    [Dear Professor,]
     
    I am sure you have read the news reports about Senator Warren. I am wondering what you think of the position you put forward some years ago. See …, Intersectionality and Positionality: Situating Women of Color in the Affirmative Action Dialogue, 66 Fordham L. Rev. 843, 898 (1997) (“Harvard Law School hired its first woman of color, Elizabeth Warren, in 1995.”); id. at 898 n.284 (citing to …, News Director, Harvard Law School (Aug. 6, 1996)) ….
     
    Perhaps a follow up or letter to the editor (at Fordham Law Review) might be interesting and worthwhile. See Fordham Law Review (e-mail); (alt e-mail) ….
     
    [. . .]

    Read the rest.

    Posted in Academia, Leftism, Media, Politics, USA | 8 Comments »

    Quotes of the Day

    Posted by Jonathan on 11th October 2018 (All posts by )

    Via Instapundit, exerpts from this column by Reihan Salam:

    The study should also make progressives more self-critical about the way in which speech norms serve as a marker of social distinction. I don’t doubt the sincerity of the affluent and highly educated people who call others out if they use “problematic” terms or perpetrate an act of “cultural appropriation.” But what the vast majority of Americans seem to see—at least according to the research conducted for “Hidden Tribes”—is not so much genuine concern for social justice as the preening display of cultural superiority.
     
    For the millions upon millions of Americans of all ages and all races who do not follow politics with rapt attention, and who are much more worried about paying their rent than about debating the prom dress worn by a teenager in Utah, contemporary callout culture merely looks like an excuse to mock the values or ignorance of others. . .
     
    [. . .]
     
    In a democracy, it is difficult to win fellow citizens over to your own side, or to build public support to remedy injustices that remain all too real, when you fundamentally misunderstand how they see the world.

    . . . which links to this column:

    Shortly before the 2016 presidential election, The New York Times columnist Ross Douthat observed that though the left has always had a disproportionate presence in the commanding heights of culture, “the swing toward social liberalism among younger Americans and the simultaneous surge of activist energy on the left have created a new dynamic, in which areas once considered relatively apolitical now have (or are being pushed to have) an overtly left-wing party line.” This, he argued, has engendered a sense of panic and resentment among those who don’t embrace social liberalism, and as a consequence, “the feeling of being suffocated by the left’s cultural dominance is turning voting Republican into an act of cultural rebellion.” At the time, I recall that Douthat’s argument was widely ridiculed, especially among those who found the notion that Donald Trump might win the White House risible. That has changed.
     
    [. . .]
     
    What is new, I would argue, is the second development: that the number of people who are susceptible to elite influence has grown larger. Here is where I must tread lightly, as what follows is necessarily impressionistic. I get the sense that the most aggressively “woke” young people are precisely those who find themselves in the most fiercely competitive environments. Status and prestige matter to everyone, of course, but they matter to some more than others. Most of all, they matter to those who find themselves in precarious industries where one’s reputation counts for a great deal and, just as importantly, to lonely, unattached people who long to feel valued and desired. Delayed marriage and child-rearing ensure that many more young people spend many more years in the mating market and, by extension, orienting their lives around fulfilling their own social and sexual appetites over the care and feeding of children. This is especially true among children of the culturally powerful upper-middle-class, who’ve been trained to fear downward mobility in a stratified society as much as our primitive ancestors feared being devoured by toothy predators. The result is what you might call a culture of “competitive wokeness.”
     
    To people in this world, traditionalism must look like a dead end. A commitment to it will do nothing to improve your status in ferociously competitive environments, as those who’ve already scrambled to the top of the ladder tend to hold traditionalist ideals in disdain. Besides, to embrace traditionalist ideals would be to reject the terms of the social tournament to which you’ve chosen to dedicate your life—to decide that devotion to family and community ought to trump individual achievement. If you were to find yourself in this hyper-competitive world, well, you’d be foolish not to emulate the highest-status people you could find. Thanks to social media, you can access their opinions on all and sundry in an instant. The result is a kind of swarm effect in which high-status moral entrepreneurs declare the right position to take on a given issue and then, within minutes, hordes of epigones scramble to adopt and enforce the new orthodoxy. If you’re a good enough enforcer, you might soon find yourself in a position to dictate the new party line.

    I think we need more activism, to raise awareness about the high costs of social media, divorce, and late marriage among educated women.
     

    Posted in Conservatism, Leftism, Political Philosophy, Politics, Quotations, Trump | 4 Comments »

    GOTV

    Posted by Jonathan on 10th October 2018 (All posts by )

    early, often, post-mortem

    Chicago voters line up at polling place.

     

    Posted in Elections, Photos, That's NOT Funny | 3 Comments »

    New! – Your Friday That’s-All-I-Got Burnt Haiku Offering

    Posted by Jonathan on 5th October 2018 (All posts by )

    “Hi, this is Bridget. . .”
    The phony recorded voice
    Cues you to hang up.

    —-

    New Android update!
    Now the apps run much slower,
    Battery dies fast.

    —-

    The people next door
    Are into Santeria.
    Better hide your cat.

    —-

    Your middle-class friends
    Are sometimes rude to smokers.
    Time to get new friends?

    —-

    Morning home-leaving.
    Your dog thinks it’s betrayal.
    Perhaps he’s correct.

    —-

    Fat girl riding bike.
    She looks angry, I say Hi.
    She doesn’t respond.

    —-

    Feel free to add your contributions in the comments.
     

    Posted in Poetry | 14 Comments »

    Seth Barrett Tillman: Peak Conlawprof (I) and (II)

    Posted by Jonathan on 27th September 2018 (All posts by )

    https://reformclub.blogspot.com/2018/09/peak-conlawprof-i-and-ii.html

    Too short to quote; worth clicking.

    Posted in Law, Leftism, Politics | 3 Comments »

    New! – Your Vaguely Stressed-Out Middle Class Post-20th Century Haikus

    Posted by Jonathan on 21st September 2018 (All posts by )

    Bless our New Age friends!
    You need cancer remedies,
    They suggest. . . massage.

    —-

    It’s the Age of Waze:
    Rush hour turns across traffic,
    Third World risk taking.

    —-

    Windows networking –
    Still a huge pain in the ass.
    Some things never change.

    —-

    Turns out your girlfriend
    Ran an asset search on you.
    Time to hit the road?
    Read the rest of this entry »

    Posted in Poetry | 11 Comments »

    Quote of the Day

    Posted by Jonathan on 20th September 2018 (All posts by )

    “Of course they make a ton of money, they’re a non profit.”

    (Said by a friend who used to work for a nonprofit organization.)

    Posted in Business, Quotations | 6 Comments »

    Change

    Posted by Jonathan on 7th September 2018 (All posts by )

    A CFTC report explains that open interest in long-dated NYMEX West Texas Intermediate crude oil futures continues a long-term decline.

    Jessica Summers on Bloomberg:

    That’s because oil extraction has become more efficient in tight oil fields compared to conventional wells and producers have more flexibility in turning on and off the taps in response to oil prices.
     
    The increasing amount of crude coming in from tight oil in portfolios of production firms has left them with less crude to sell five or more years forward, reducing their need for long-dated futures contracts, according to the study. U.S. weekly production has skyrocketed to 11 million barrels a day, the highest level on record, according to Energy Information Administration data.

    Posted in Business, Energy & Power Generation, Markets and Trading | 6 Comments »

    Seth Barrett Tillman: Some Reflections on Trump and his North Korean Condominiums

    Posted by Jonathan on 4th September 2018 (All posts by )

    On Omaha Beach, the French have put up two monuments—one traditional and one more modern. The beach itself is open and used. People traverse the beach and dip their feet in its cold water. Small children play in the sand. There is ample parking for tourists. There are places to buy souvenirs. And not so distant from the epicentre of the beach and its monuments—people have private homes. Maybe some of those homes are condominiums—I don’t know. What this means is that at some point, temporally and geographically, the mourning and the monuments must run out. Yes, the dead are buried. But the earth belongs in usufruct to the living.

    Read the whole thing.

    Posted in Current Events, Korea, Trump, War and Peace | 2 Comments »

    Two Quick Movie Reviews

    Posted by Jonathan on 3rd September 2018 (All posts by )

    Review 1: Cuban Food Stories

    I saw this one at the Tower Theater while drinking Cuban coffee on an empty stomach. It’s a documentary by a Cuban emigre who travels around Cuba and talks to people about food. These are people who catch, grow, prepare, serve and/or sell food. The film is beautiful, the people charming, the settings picturesque, the food wonderful. There are spectacular drone shots of colorful towns, lush forests and rural landscapes, and closeups of ceviche, grilled octopus, roast pork and other delicacies. You will leave the theater hungry.

    This movie made me feel good about Cuba, which leads to another thought. In addition to its good qualities this movie is slick, well done propaganda. Perhaps the film maker really is ambivalent about having emigrated, as he suggests. Or perhaps he would not have been allowed to make this movie without showing Cuba in the most favorable light, i.e., things were bad in the ’90s but today they are getting better, people are better off and happy, it’s a great place to visit, etc. However, the hardships of daily life are obvious to anyone who looks. As my movie viewing companion said afterwards, the people in the film spend most of their time looking for food. One notices their teeth, their overall look of having been through hard times. The electricity fails. The happy fisherman was trained as a physicist and now rationalizes his difficult life (what else can he do?).

    I recommend this movie as long as you can enjoy the food and not be bothered by any political subtexts. Verdict: Four thumbs up, one thumb down.

    —-

    Review 2: The Black Stallion Returns (also available on Netflix)

    This is a really bad movie. I enjoyed the original whose plot involves a special horse that falls off a boat and saves the little boy who rides the horse to victory in the big race. Cartoonish but so are most movies and this one was visually beautiful, apolitical and had a happy ending. Plus the horse porn if you are into such things. Then I got talked into watching the sequel.

    The newer movie revolves around a struggle between good and bad Arabs to repatriate the famous horse to the Sahara where they plan to run it in a hokey every-5-years race on which tribes with poor risk-management skills bet the farm. You can tell the good from the bad Arabs because the main bad Arab is fat and has a Brooklyn accent and the good Arabs are thin and have Roman accents. Also we are made to understand that the bad Arabs cheat rather than follow important movie rules of noble-savage fair play. The good Arabs take the horse and explain to the little boy that it’s really theirs, and who can blame them. They head off for Casablanca and the boy follows in a flying boat. Much drama and silly plot escapades follow until inevitably the little boy wins the big race for the good Arabs but then is too stupid to either take the horse back home with him or sleep with the hot Arab chick who would do him in a second since he’s now the high-status race winner.

    I recommend this movie if you liked Mystery Science Theater, or if you have young daughters who are into horses as horse porn is probably more wholesome than vampire porn. Verdict: Four thumbs down, three thumbs up.

    Posted in Cuba, Diversions, Film | 11 Comments »

    Take the Weekend Off

    Posted by Jonathan on 1st September 2018 (All posts by )

    Take the weekend off

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    Posted in Photos | 6 Comments »

    Seth Barrett Tillman: Who Was Right About the Emoluments Clauses? Judge Messitte or President Washington?

    Posted by Jonathan on 3rd August 2018 (All posts by )

    Josh Blackman & Seth Barrett Tillman at The Volokh Conspiracy:

    For now, it is enough that we point out that the District of Maryland’s five-page rebuke of our brief rests on plain historical error. Moreover, that error was enabled by errors in the Plaintiffs’ briefs. On appeal, the burden remains on the Plaintiffs to show that the District of Maryland, and not President Washington, is the more faithful arbiter of the Emoluments Clauses.

    Worth reading.

    Posted in History, Law, Trump | 1 Comment »

    Too Pessimistic

    Posted by Jonathan on 1st August 2018 (All posts by )

    The Origins of Our Second Civil War by Victor Davis Hanson.

    The first half of this VDH piece seems over-the-top. Would the intermarriage and cultural assimilation that he cites in his next-to-last paragraph be happening if the situation were as bad as he thinks? Or is the country mostly culturally sound but burdened with dysfunctional elites dominating politics, big business, the universities and the media.

    This part is good:

    Again, Obama most unfortunately redefined race as a white-versus-nonwhite binary, in an attempt to build a new coalition of progressives, on the unspoken assumption that the clingers were destined to slow irrelevance and with them their retrograde and obstructionist ideas. In other words, the Left could win most presidential elections of the future, as Obama did, by writing off the interior and hyping identity politics on the two coasts.
     
    The Obama administration hinged on leveraging these sociocultural, political, and economic schisms even further. The split pitted constitutionalism and American exceptionalism and tradition on the one side versus globalist ecumenicalism and citizenry of the world on the other. Of course, older divides — big government, high taxes, redistributionist social-welfare schemes, and mandated equality of result versus limited government, low taxes, free-market individualism, and equality of opportunity — were replayed, but sharpened in these new racial, cultural, and economic landscapes.

    The rest of the piece is also good and points out how the country’s situation might improve. “A steady 3 to 4 percent growth in annual GDP” doesn’t seem very far from where we are. University reform seems likely as the public increasingly catches on to the corruption and excessive costs of higher education. Race relations seem to improve when not politicized. Spiritual and religious reawakenings happen every few generations.

    Keyboard trash talk and dark speculations about violence and civil war are not the same as actual violence. They might even be safety valves to release transient passions, cautionary tales, for everyone outside of a tiny lunatic minority. (The lunatic minority who are spurred to action by online/media hype are a serious problem, but not mainly a political one except as regards public and hence political unwillingness to force treatment on recalcitrant individuals with severe mental-health issues.)

    Today’s political violence is a problem but not one at the level of 1968 much less 1861. Almost all of the action now is in the political realm. There is little reason to expect an intractable impasse on a fundamental issue as in 1850-60 over slavery. There is no substantial constituency favoring civil war as there was in 1861. The modern federal government is huge, profligate and obnoxious, but risk-averse deep-state bureaucrats and crony-capitalist opportunists aren’t going to take physical risks to defend the status quo. The political process still responds to public concerns about governmental overreach, which is probably a large part of why Trump was elected. There is also enough collective memory of the last civil war and its awfulness to discourage enthusiasm for a replay from anyone who is sane.

    None of this is to say dire predictions won’t come to pass, but that’s not the way to bet. The country has been through harder times and surmounted them through politics rather than violence. My money’s on the basic soundness of our culture and political system this time as well.

    Posted in America 3.0, Culture, Current Events, History, Human Behavior, Obama, Politics, Rhetoric, Trump, USA | 23 Comments »

    Seth Barrett Tillman: CONLAWPROF: A Post on Nativists and White Supremacists

    Posted by Jonathan on 20th July 2018 (All posts by )

    Quoted in full:

    Got it. It is all clear now.
     
    You wrote: “It is a bald racial appeal to [Trump’s] white supremacist, nativist base.”
     
    When you wrote the above, you were not saying that Trump’s base is made of “white supremacist[s]” and “nativist[s]”. Instead you were speaking to that part of Trump’s base which is “white supremacist” and “nativist”. It is really obvious from context—except that it is not. And your after-the-fact, clarification is very helpful. And we should also generously ascribe the best interpretation we can to your original and revised statements.
     
    Of course . . . don’t do any of this close textual parsing of ambiguous language for Trump, and don’t look to his after-the-fact clarifications. That would be totally crazy. Makes no sense. Totally different. Of course, we should a hold a businessperson-turned-politician to a stricter standard than a [legal] academic. See Trump, Academia, and Hyperbole, http://reformclub.blogspot.com/2016/08/trump-academia-and-hyperbole.html. Makes complete sense.
     
    By the way . . . throw me a bone here . . . you are now saying you were only speaking to part of Trump’s base. How big a part do you (and Professor X) think that segment of Trump’s base is? Does it include Trump’s Hispanic voters (maybe some 20% of the Hispanic vote) and his African-American voters (maybe some 10% of the African-American vote). And if it does not include them, exactly who is left in that base that you are calling nativist, etc? Who?
     
    Throw me a bone. What precisely do you and Professor X (now) mean?

    Seth’s post may touch a nerve for some of us who have been confronted, in some cases over most of our lives, with lefty ad-hominems dressed up as arguments:

    People who support Trump’s policies are [racists/sexists/uneducated idiots].

    People who oppose Obama’s policies are racists.

    People who favor Reagan’s tax cuts are in it for the money.

    etc.

    These kinds of statements are attempts to end-run argument on the merits by imputing bad faith to the people on the other side and hoping that that shuts them up. In some cases this is done maliciously, in others it’s from lazy ignorance by people who should know better (dog whistles! projection!).

    It’s nice when people at whom such attacks are directed respond both on the merits and by running to ground nasty insinuations that sometimes pass for serious argument in left-wing circles. I suppose leftists would say the same thing about conservatives’ arguments, but maybe that’s projection by me. In any case it’s probably best that discussions of contentious topics include people with diverse views.

    AVI has a characteristically insightful comment at Seth’s blog.

    Posted in Leftism, Political Philosophy, Politics, Rhetoric, Trump | 3 Comments »

    Quote of the Day

    Posted by Jonathan on 17th July 2018 (All posts by )

    Caroline Glick:

    Trump scares the Europeans. He doesn’t scare them because he expects them to pay for their own defense. All of his predecessors had the same expectation. He frightens the Europeans because he ignores their rhetoric while mercilessly exposing their true policy and refuses to accept it. They are scared that Trump intends to exact a price from them for their weak-kneed treachery.

    Intends to exact a price. That is what Trump’s political enemies really object to about him.

    Posted in Europe, Israel, Politics, Trump | 21 Comments »

    Seth Barrett Tillman: My Post on CONLAWPROF: my response to a discussion about removing Trump from office

    Posted by Jonathan on 17th July 2018 (All posts by )

    If your dispute with Trump and your call for his removal are based on policy (and his language about policy), rather than about discrete factual predicates amounting to legal violations, then you should eschew the language of the criminal law and push forward with debates (in this forum and elsewhere) about the prospective dangers you think Trump is creating or the harms he has already caused. But as I said, the country survived Johnson. To the extent that the argument against Trump is based on his saying stuff you think outrageous, I think the country will survive his talking big. I would also add that Trump has done little (as I see it) which substantially departs from his campaign statements—so a removal based on political disagreement about the expected consequences of policy is not going to be one with a strong democratic justification.
     
    Technical point: It may be that deporting foreigners is not a criminal punishment, but exiling/banishing/deporting Americans who are in the country legally would seem to me to amount to a violation of a 14th Amendment liberty interest. This brings up an important cultural divide in America today (and not just in America, but across the Western world). Many of Trump’s supporters see the elites as being indifferent between their fellow citizens and foreigners. I ask you not to prove them correct.

    Read the whole thing.

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    Posted in Elections, History, Immigration, Law, Political Philosophy, Politics, Tradeoffs, Trump | 2 Comments »

    I would take it a step further.

    Posted by Jonathan on 9th July 2018 (All posts by )

    The conclusion of a Glenn Reynolds USA Today column about pro-governing-class selection bias in US Supreme Court nominations:

    To counteract this, we might want to bring a bit more diversity to the court. I’m not recommending that we eliminate the informal requirement that judges have law degrees (though non-lawyer judges were common in colonial times, and some countries still use them). But maybe we should look outside the Ivy League and the federal appellate courts. A Supreme Court justice who served on a state court — especially one who had to run for election — would probably have a much broader view of America than a thoroughbred who went from the Ivy League to an appellate clerkship to a fancy law firm.

    I would expand on this thought to suggest US presidents give preference to candidates who have run small businesses, have had run-ins with bureaucratic authorities and/or been arrested.

    Lex adds:

    Agreed.

    If Trump gets a second term, I’d like to see Mike Lee on the Supreme Court.

    I like Glenn Reynolds’s idea: 59 Justices. Nine appointed by the President, and one appointed from each state by the governor. Bloody brilliant.

    Posted in Civil Liberties, Civil Society, Law, Politics, Tea Party | 7 Comments »

    Seth Barrett Tillman: Poland’s Judicial Crisis: My Post on CONLAWPROF

    Posted by Jonathan on 4th July 2018 (All posts by )

    Arrayed against the policy of the elected government of Poland (which ran for election twice on this policy) is: the EU Commission (not elected), the decisions of the European Court of Human Rights (not elected), the Council of Europe / Venice Commission (not elected), and any number of Polish judges — all appointed by a process wholly insulated from democratic control. But I repeat myself.
    &nbsp:
    I cannot prove this, but I expect if during our domestic squabbles involving the elected arms of the government manipulating the federal courts (circa 1802, and again circa 1863, or even today in relation to court packing) a bunch of international organisations told us what to do, such interventions would not have been (and will not be in the future) very welcomed, and might very well have made (and will make in the future) normal political compromise less likely.
     
    “Purge”. If you want more Trump … but I repeat myself.

    Read the whole thing.

    Posted in Elections, Europe, Law, Politics, Trump | 2 Comments »

    Posted by Jonathan on 22nd June 2018 (All posts by )

    woof

    Chicagoboyz approach Peak Chihuahua.

     

    Posted in Photos | 2 Comments »

    Quote of the Day

    Posted by Jonathan on 19th June 2018 (All posts by )

    Assistant Village Idiot:

    The Cause of the Week is never reported accurately. It is chosen for emotional elements which suspend rational thought.

    It’s literally true!

    Posted in Deep Thoughts, Media, Politics, Quotations, Rhetoric | 1 Comment »

    Chicago Boyz Waiting Room Series: 12

    Posted by Jonathan on 9th June 2018 (All posts by )

    unhappy endings

     

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    Posted in Photos, Waiting Rooms | 8 Comments »

    Chicago Boyz Waiting Room Series: 11

    Posted by Jonathan on 5th June 2018 (All posts by )

    they're not waiting

    Posted in Photos, Waiting Rooms | Comments Off on Chicago Boyz Waiting Room Series: 11

    Chicago Boyz Waiting Room Series: 10

    Posted by Jonathan on 1st June 2018 (All posts by )

    works

     

    Posted in Photos, Waiting Rooms | 4 Comments »