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  • Your Post Apocalyptic Cinnamon Coffee Cake Recipe

    Posted by Dan from Madison on January 23rd, 2021 (All posts by )

    Well, after all fifty state capitols being assaulted last week as predicted by the FBI and an extremely excited media, along with an inauguration that was marred by violent, huge mobs of country overthrowers and coup starters, I’m in the mood for some coffee cake.

    When my grandmother died many years ago and we were doing her death cleaning, I wanted just a few things – the collection of antique beer steins, the stand mixer and the box of recipes. I was fortunately granted all of the above. Today’s recipe is one that grandma got from one Clara Jensen according to the index card, a person I don’t necessarily remember. This coffee cake turned out really good, but in general, most coffee cake, to me at least, has a ceiling as far as quality and taste goes. It is very easy to make and of course you can alter to your taste but this is pretty solid.

    2 cups flour
    1 tsp cinnamon
    1 cup sugar
    1/2 tsp salt
    1 tsp baking soda
    1 tsp baking powder
    1/2 cup brown sugar

    Sift all of these dry ingredients together. Mix that with:

    2/3 cup room temperature shortening
    2 eggs
    1 cup buttermilk
    Put in a 9×13.

    Topping:
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    1/2 tsp nutmeg
    1/2 tsp cinnamon
    nuts (optional)

    Sprinkle topping on top of dough.

    Bake at 350 for 25-30 mins. I went 28 and it turned out just fine.

    Enjoy!

     

    17 Responses to “Your Post Apocalyptic Cinnamon Coffee Cake Recipe”

    1. Jonathan Says:

      This is news that I can use.

    2. Mike K Says:

      I made the rye bread recipe a few years ago. Maybe I’ll try this one.

      The rye bread was pretty good.

    3. Assistant Village Idiot Says:

      “Well, after all fifty state capitols being assaulted last week as predicted by the FBI and an extremely excited media, along with an inauguration that was marred by violent, huge mobs of country overthrowers and coup starters, I’m in the mood for some coffee cake.”

      That was a nice bit of writing.

    4. Tatyana Says:

      Read two times.
      Still haven’t found any mention of coffee.

    5. Sgt. Mom Says:

      It’s an Americanism, Tatyana – it’s cake to eat accompanied by coffee. ;-)

    6. Tatyana Says:

      Here, an actual coffee cake (Lithuanian recipe):

      150g butter
      150g sugar
      3 large or 2 jumbo eggs
      coffee extract (1/2 cup warm milk +4 tsp of instant coffee)
      1 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 tsp powdered cloves, 1/2 tsp nutmeg, 2 tsp baking powder
      250g flour
      butter, breadcrumbs for dusting the baking form

      start with softened butter+sugar, then whip in eggs one by one, add coffee extract. mix all dry ingredient in a separate bowl, slowly whisk into wet mixture.
      bake at mid heat for 40-45min

    7. Tatyana Says:

      Sgt, if we start counting things to be eaten accompanied by coffee…”coffee” as adjective will be pretty menanigless

    8. Dan from Madison Says:

      Correct Sgt. Mom, cake meant to be eaten with coffee. I don’t remember grandma making cake with actual coffee in it. But who knows it might have happened.

      This is quite interesting.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffee_cake

      @Tatyana – I’m going to give that a whirl.

    9. Tatyana Says:

      Aha, so it’s used to mean the same thing:
      “In the 19th century, American cooks also used coffee as an ingredient to thriftily use up leftovers, reducing waste, and flavor the cake.”

      I’m pretty sure I have more coffee cake recipes in my Belgian cookbook

    10. Anonymous Says:

      Shouldn’t this be called coup cake? (to be enjoyed while watching video of the coordinated violent insurrections in all 50 states, DC and Puerto Rico)

      Death6

    11. Sgt. Mom Says:

      A couple of days ago, I decided to try out a recipe for homemade bagels in the latest issue of Cuisine at Home – and they came out very well, for the first batch. Stuck to the tinfoil on the pan – I should have used parchment paper as called for, and I will have to perfect my forming technique – but they came out nice and chewy and properly bagel-like. Sliced and toasted the next day — very nice. Definitely worth another try; much better than the supermarket variety, almost as good as from Einstein’s Bagels. Plain old yeast dough, set to rise, then shaped, refrigerated overnight, then boiled briefly and baked at a high temperature in the oven. Piece of cake! (or bagel)

      And I have high standards for bagels, as Mom used to detour into Little Tel Aviv on the way home from church on Sundays, and buy a bag of fresh baked bagels from one of the Jewish bakeries – our treat on the way home.

    12. Roy Says:

      Indeed, Death6. For some enjoyable time assisting in savoring the long international attraction coffee has, try the link below. By the aria about 4 1/2 minutes in, you’ll have some foreshadowing of the fun development.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nifUBDgPhl4

    13. Gringo Says:

      Mike K
      I made the rye bread recipe a few years ago. Maybe I’ll try this one.The rye bread was pretty good.

      I recently had a yearning for some rye/pumpernickel/black bread. I found out that HEB no longer stocked rye flour in 5 pound bags in its own brand. Rye flour is now going for $2-$3 a pound in local stores. I am not going to pay a higher price per pound for flour than I do for meat. I decided to substitute whole wheat flour for rye flour in a black bread recipe. Turned out fine.

      My father prepared a Christmas morning breakfast the same way every year. Locally made kielbasa- the best kielbasa I’ve ever had. He made a coffee cake. One difference with Dan’s grandmother’s recipe is that my father used coconut.

      Yes, the predicted rioting resulting in the need for some coffee cake made for some good writing. Or should I say some good rioting? :)

    14. Assistant Village Idiot Says:

      Germans and Scandinavians, who I believe originated the term (Kaffekuchen, Kaffe kake) do not use coffee in their sweet cakes that they eat with coffee. It never pays to be literal with any language. They all have too many idioms and sharp turns.

    15. Mike K Says:

      Locally made kielbasa- the best kielbasa I’ve ever had.

      My uncle loved Polish sausage and used to go the Calumet River in south Chicago where there was a little shop floating on a raft in the river. They sold the nastiest sausage I have ever seen or tasted. He called it “Horsecock sausage” and loved it. Sort of like blood sausage, which I could never get a taste for. His name for it was never uttered around my aunt.

    16. ruralbob Says:

      And I have high standards for bagels, as Mom used to detour into Little Tel Aviv on the way home from church on Sundays, and buy a bag of fresh baked bagels from one of the Jewish bakeries – our treat on the way home.

      Having grown up near NYC, I also have high standards for bagels. It’s very difficult to find a really good one. As a kid, I used to eat them like doughnuts – no slicing, no toasting, no toppings. I’ve tried to make my own with minimal success. Kudos to you for your success!

    17. Sgt. Mom Says:

      RuralBob, try out the recipe in Cuisine at Home – it really yielded most promising results. The water for them to be boiled in contained baking soda, and the dough was just bread flour, yeast, kosher salt and warm water with a tablespoon of honey in it.