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  • No, Really

    Posted by Lexington Green on October 31st, 2011 (All posts by )

    A few months ago I wrote that I was going to stop obsessing about the presidential election.

    Dan correctly called bullish*t.

    But, I am now thinking more and more that (1) the time and energy spent thinking about the presidential election is wasted, and time is too precious to waste, and there is too much else that must be done, and (2) even if you must pay attention to politics, the down-ticket races are the ones that will matter, and it is possible to get involved and make a difference in those races, and I encourage everyone to do so.

    So, no kidding, this time for sure, I am done with this presidential election.

    I put my hands over my ears, close my eyes, and go ya ya ya ya ya ya ya really loud.

    At least until way, way closer to next November.

     

    14 Responses to “No, Really”

    1. OfficeRonin Says:

      Good luck!

      What has comforted me is knowing that it does not matter anymore. Where we are (well, where I firmly believe we are) on the Laffer curve means that we will have to slash entitlements, either voluntarily or involuntarily. The whole argument on the morality of our entitlement structure is rendered obsolete by the economic reality of our situation.

    2. Dan from Madison Says:

      Does this include comments on other peoples posts or just you posting on your own?

    3. Anonymous Says:

      Office Ronin (what an interesting pseudonym) – we can go the way of Greece – have politicos refuse to do the cuts we need, riots in the street, etc, etc – that’s about the time I head for deep Alaska.

      Everyone is focused on the Presidential race – if we don’t turn the Senate a lot is just wishful thinking…

    4. Lexington Green Says:

      Dan, I do not know.

      I get more subjective utility talking about Stefan Zweig, for example, than about Mitt Romney.

      Also, I prefer not to write where I don’t bring something novel to the conversation, like a first hand account of an event.

      But we will see where the line is between blogging and obsessing.

    5. Jonathan Says:

      I get more subjective utility talking about Stefan Zweig, for example, than about Mitt Romney.

      You’re not the only one.

    6. Dan from Madison Says:

      “I get more subjective utility talking about Stefan Zweig, for example, than about Mitt Romney.” Plus one on that.

      Anon – I think turning the Senate is just about a sure thing. People betting with actual money on InTrade give it over 70%. That is why I don’t think the presidency is too big of a deal as the R’s should also have the House. The Once can be the scapegoat when we are all eating canned food in 2016 and hopefully Paul Ryan can sweep into the WH at that time.

    7. Michael Kennedy Says:

      Obama has shown a real interest in ruling by decree regardless of the legalities. I believe thoswe who think they can out last him are dreaming. This is an outlaw regime.

    8. Lexington Green Says:

      Even so, his likely challenger, after all kinds of sturm und drang, will be Mitt Romney. If it turns out to be Herman Cain instead, that will be a lot more interesting. But blogging about it, which in my case would simply be offering yet one more opinion about information everyone else already has, seems like a poor use of my time.

      On here I’d rather talk about stuff that is different enough that it is interesting to me and to others.

    9. Michael Hiteshew Says:

      “I think turning the Senate is just about a sure thing. People betting with actual money on InTrade give it over 70%. That is why I don’t think the presidency is too big of a deal as the R’s should also have the House.”

      But if you have the presidency, it sure makes passing sweeping legislation a whole lot easier!

    10. Lexington Green Says:

      Don’t get me wrong. I want a GOP president. Romney over Obama is a no brainer. Hell, Olympia Snowe over Obama would be a no brainer.

      I do not say the presidential race is not important.

      (Supreme Court nominations are particularly important. The worst possible Romney pick will be better than the best possible Obama pick.)

      I just say I am sure nothing I can do or say can impact it.

      I am equally sure that individual initiative can have an impact on down-ticket races, and I encourage people to get involved.

    11. OfficeRonin Says:

      Anon said:

      “Office Ronin (what an interesting pseudonym) – we can go the way of Greece – have politicos refuse to do the cuts we need, riots in the street, etc, etc – that’s about the time I head for deep Alaska.”

      I wonder if the folks at “AthensBoyz” recognized the immediate threat of violent action in the days preceding their mobs torching banks and bank employees… Using them as hindsight, I do not see a great deal of difference between our situation now and the Greek situation, then.

      In any case, I do not see any future but one where entitlement spending is slashed, no matter who is elected. Even if everything goes the democrat way, they will try to prop the current system up. That will just make it crash harder. Perhaps we need to wait until the situation degenerates to the point where a critical mass of people are willing to make those painful choices. I have seen the same mechanic as a therapist working with drug addiction, a pastor working with people getting divorced, and as a mortgage lender working with people who ignored repeated letters and calls only to be “surprised” when we foreclosed.

      This seems a very simplistic, determinist view of history, and I wonder if I am channeling Hari Seldon. :) The difference is that I think that leadership includes the honest assessment that enables us to get in front of the crisis and make decisions while there still is freedom of action; that is, before the crisis hits. However, in this case, I think that the crisis has already hit insofar as we really no longer have the capability to affect the outcome. All of our choices, at this point, lead to the same sort of outcome — and that releases a great deal of my anxiety.

      I disagree with Lexingtom Greene, however, about the focus on the down ticket races. I ignore the debates about how we will fix our mess — I view our mess as a sunk cost. I am, instead, looking for a president who can form, communicate and enact a vision that allows us to reconstruct. In short, I am looking for a leader who can get in front of the next crisis.

    12. Der Fleischermeister Says:

      Good point, I think. Think of the example in Colorado (and elsewhere) of Tim Gill, the billionaire homosexual activist. He and two other wealthy individuals focused their attention and money on local and state races, targeting those who would not follow their agenda and supporting those who would. They’ve changed the entire political landscape in Colorado and other states, which has had a direct, measurable impact on life there. I know. I live in the CO, and I worked on a state senate campaign which was opposed by these people. They won. Money talks.

      Still, I selfishly would appreciate Lex continuing to write about the presidential election. Good stuff.

      Lex – can you send me your personal e-mail address. I no longer have it. I believe you have access to mine as a result of my posting on this site.

      Thanks.

    13. Lexington Green Says:

      “I am, instead, looking for a president who can form, communicate and enact a vision that allows us to reconstruct.”

      There is no such person running this year.

      Obama we know about. Romney we know about. Cain? He is OK, but not a visionary.

      Odds are it will be Obama v. Romney.

      We will have to wait for some other year for the candidate for president who has the vision thing.

    14. Jonathan Says:

      Cain’s distinguishing qualities, at least to me, are good values, strong character, an analytical mind and experience getting hard things done. Though not a visionary, he might be the sort of leader who could push through necessary radical changes on the basis of his seeing no alternative.

      But of course, ABO.