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  • Quotes of the Day

    Posted by Jonathan on October 11th, 2018 (All posts by )

    Via Instapundit, exerpts from this column by Reihan Salam:

    The study should also make progressives more self-critical about the way in which speech norms serve as a marker of social distinction. I don’t doubt the sincerity of the affluent and highly educated people who call others out if they use “problematic” terms or perpetrate an act of “cultural appropriation.” But what the vast majority of Americans seem to see—at least according to the research conducted for “Hidden Tribes”—is not so much genuine concern for social justice as the preening display of cultural superiority.
     
    For the millions upon millions of Americans of all ages and all races who do not follow politics with rapt attention, and who are much more worried about paying their rent than about debating the prom dress worn by a teenager in Utah, contemporary callout culture merely looks like an excuse to mock the values or ignorance of others. . .
     
    [. . .]
     
    In a democracy, it is difficult to win fellow citizens over to your own side, or to build public support to remedy injustices that remain all too real, when you fundamentally misunderstand how they see the world.

    . . . which links to this column:

    Shortly before the 2016 presidential election, The New York Times columnist Ross Douthat observed that though the left has always had a disproportionate presence in the commanding heights of culture, “the swing toward social liberalism among younger Americans and the simultaneous surge of activist energy on the left have created a new dynamic, in which areas once considered relatively apolitical now have (or are being pushed to have) an overtly left-wing party line.” This, he argued, has engendered a sense of panic and resentment among those who don’t embrace social liberalism, and as a consequence, “the feeling of being suffocated by the left’s cultural dominance is turning voting Republican into an act of cultural rebellion.” At the time, I recall that Douthat’s argument was widely ridiculed, especially among those who found the notion that Donald Trump might win the White House risible. That has changed.
     
    [. . .]
     
    What is new, I would argue, is the second development: that the number of people who are susceptible to elite influence has grown larger. Here is where I must tread lightly, as what follows is necessarily impressionistic. I get the sense that the most aggressively “woke” young people are precisely those who find themselves in the most fiercely competitive environments. Status and prestige matter to everyone, of course, but they matter to some more than others. Most of all, they matter to those who find themselves in precarious industries where one’s reputation counts for a great deal and, just as importantly, to lonely, unattached people who long to feel valued and desired. Delayed marriage and child-rearing ensure that many more young people spend many more years in the mating market and, by extension, orienting their lives around fulfilling their own social and sexual appetites over the care and feeding of children. This is especially true among children of the culturally powerful upper-middle-class, who’ve been trained to fear downward mobility in a stratified society as much as our primitive ancestors feared being devoured by toothy predators. The result is what you might call a culture of “competitive wokeness.”
     
    To people in this world, traditionalism must look like a dead end. A commitment to it will do nothing to improve your status in ferociously competitive environments, as those who’ve already scrambled to the top of the ladder tend to hold traditionalist ideals in disdain. Besides, to embrace traditionalist ideals would be to reject the terms of the social tournament to which you’ve chosen to dedicate your life—to decide that devotion to family and community ought to trump individual achievement. If you were to find yourself in this hyper-competitive world, well, you’d be foolish not to emulate the highest-status people you could find. Thanks to social media, you can access their opinions on all and sundry in an instant. The result is a kind of swarm effect in which high-status moral entrepreneurs declare the right position to take on a given issue and then, within minutes, hordes of epigones scramble to adopt and enforce the new orthodoxy. If you’re a good enough enforcer, you might soon find yourself in a position to dictate the new party line.

    I think we need more activism, to raise awareness about the high costs of social media, divorce, and late marriage among educated women.
     

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    4 Responses to “Quotes of the Day”

    1. Brian Says:

      This is also impressionistic, but it seems like the media is dominated far more than ever before by people under 30, and their messaging is far more incestuous and interconnected thanks to twitter, which is an incredible echo chamber.

    2. Tom G Says:

      Nahh, we don’t need more activism. Especially not by the childish “over-indoctrinated” college co-eds who go out and live promiscuous lives, yet don’t find love & respect, so remain unmarried and childless.

      Wait — maybe a couple more generations of that is exactly what the human race needs. Let’s see, Dem coed fertility at 0.9, total American fertility at 1.8, pro-life women fertility at 2.3.

      At some point, maybe sooner than expected, Demographics is Destiny.

    3. Anonymous Says:

      Tom G, that made me chuckle. You have explained to me how the balance toward pro-life has happened in the past decades. Applicable more generally as well. Thanks.

      Death6

    4. Phil Ossiferz Stone Says:

      Here’s your demographics, Tom.

      https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/washington-secrets/nearly-half-in-top-5-u-s-cities-dont-speak-english-at-home-record-67-million

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