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  • Talk about bleeding edge

    Posted by In-Cog-Nito on February 27th, 2004 (All posts by )

    Mrs. Nito and I will be having our first baby soon. In anticipation, I’m in the market for a camcorder and a DVD recorder to record everything.

    I found this little wonder via Gotapex.com: Tivo and DVD recorder mixed into one. If I’m not mistaken, this pretty much makes you the coolest kid on the block. Anyone with opinions one way or other on DVD recorders and/or PVR-DVDR combos?

     

    4 Responses to “Talk about bleeding edge”

    1. tom walsh Says:

      If you have a DVD-PVR combo, what do you do when the PVR hard disk goes belly-up? The same thing with a TV-VCR combo. Hard to service, and when one half goes, you are stuck with the repair/replace question. You can get equivalent picture and sound quality with S-Video or video-out and RCA plug audio connections, I believe.
      tom

    2. In-Cog-Nito Says:

      Yes, more to break. But sure must be nice to use before it breaks eh? As with most technologies though, I think I’ll wait and see what else comes down the pipes.

    3. Fazal Majid Says:

      I have a Panasonic PVR-DVD combo. The UI sucks compared to my old TiVo, but at least I know I am not being spied on. For producing DVDs, you have only very basic editing capabilities. The DVD burner should only be seen as a way to offload recorded movies, it is too limited in functionality to edit home videos.

      iMovie + iDVD on the Mac is far superior to anything you would find in a PVR-DVD combo, and there are less elegant but still serviceable equivalents on Windows.

      In any case, budget approximately 10 hours of work for 1 hour of final DVD produced, at least initially. Editing video is very labor-intensive.

    4. In-Cog-Nito Says:

      Thank you Fazal. Very good insight. The more I read, the less I liked as well about the PVR/DVD. I think as with most technologies, the more specialized the better.

      Ouch on the 10 hours. The most I’ve ever edited were 5-10 minute clips for work. Time is a premium nowadays, so I think I’ll go with something like Philip’s push a button and get results deal.