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  • A Swedish Neo-Conservative Writes About America

    Posted by David Foster on June 21st, 2014 (All posts by )

    Read her thoughts & observations, here.

    Annika has been a leader in support of Israel and against Swedish anti-Semitism.  Link

     

    4 Responses to “A Swedish Neo-Conservative Writes About America”

    1. Michael Hiteshew Says:

      Looks like you have join Ricochet to read it.

    2. David Foster Says:

      Sorry….I see now that it’s on the Member feed…thought it was on the Main feed…requesting now that it be promoted.

      Meanwhile, some excerpts:

      “I was born and raised in a sleepy west-coast town in the early 1980′s, in a country an inch from being a full-blown DDR-state. I should be a socialist feminist performance artist, or a hipster filmmaker, passionate about gender-neutral daycare and sourdough bread. But I got lucky, and I broke away from the herd. I first stepped on US soil in the spring of 1990….I’m not sure if I can fully convey the cultural shock of going from 1990′s Sweden to Dallas, Texas, or if it is even wise to try. Because how can I describe what it is to taste your very first doughnut or go to Toys R Us and see row after row of wonderfully girly Barbie-dolls? I came from the country of meh to the nation of yeah. And it was nothing short of magnificent. I was lucky enough to spend my summers there, in the heart of Texas, and with every visit I gained a growing awareness of the differences between your country and mine. America was loud. It was uncomfortable and alive. People were different, not only from Swedes, but from each other. It was the small stuff. There were flags flown publicly, showing national pride while maintaining a strong sense of individuality. People prayed at the dinner table, and even in schools! Women were allowed to choose to be home with their kids without guilt or government penalty, and people still got married and protected the institution of the traditional family. In America I saw all these astounding, giant, little things; and an amazing mix of rallying behind your country, while at the same time demanding its leaders to be accountable, for your rights to be respected and your voices to be heard.”

      and

      “In the past years I have seen the country I love so much change, moving toward the country I grew up in. I saw a President get elected on change, and apparently things had changed enough by 2012 to hand him a re-election. Well, guess what? I know the change that your president speaks of. I have lived it, and I live it still. I know what happens when government trumps individual, I know what it is when you apologize for the values that built your land and I have seen the horrific results of a nation equating exceptionalism with brutality and deeming values moronic and obsolete. I know one thing for sure: If you grow up in a country that doesn’t ask anything of you, you end up living an entire life without asking anything of yourself. Expecting nothing, excelling at nothing, with no repercussions for failure and no incentive for growth. And it kills your very soul.”

    3. David Foster Says:

      Finally up on the main feed, so it can be read by non-Ricochet-members. Link is still the same, here.

    4. Assistant Village Idiot Says:

      That was fun. I’m sending it to my son living in Norway. (He was originally Romanian until he came here at 14, and was in the USMC before moving to Tromso.)