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  • Quote of the Day

    Posted by Jonathan on April 3rd, 2006 (All posts by )

    My idea of an assimilated immigrant is someone with a strong commitment to the Bill of Rights, separation of powers, and federalism.

    Arnold Kling

     

    6 Responses to “Quote of the Day”

    1. Ginny Says:

      Thanks – a nice summary.

    2. Lex Says:

      I wouldn’t mind if some of the people who are here already thought that way, or even knew that those words meant. I don’t think more than 20% (probably high)of the American people could give you an intelligent two or three sentences on what “federalism” is or what is in the Bill of Rights. If people who are citizens now had to pass that test to stay here, our cities would be ghost towns.

      To me an assimilated immigrant is someone who wants to work for a living, stay out of trouble, keep his kids off the street, eventually buy his own house and learn English as soon as possible. If we get that much we are in good shape.

    3. Helen Says:

      Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness? Just a thought.

    4. Sulaiman Says:

      Basic understanding of English is equally important. How would an immigrant know about the Bill Rights, Constitution, and federalism without the language?

    5. Don Says:

      Sulaiman,

      It appears that most members of the Supreme Court have a understanding of English, but their understanding of what the words of the Constitution say and what I understand the words say appear to be two different things.

    6. Sulaiman Says:

      Don – SC deals with issues that were not faced by the authors of the constitution. Their problem is that of interpretation, not of English. For immigrants we are talking about more basic rights that both liberals and conservatives agree upon.