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  • Worthwhile Reading & Viewing

    Posted by David Foster on October 2nd, 2014 (All posts by )

    The festival of lights in Thailand

    Three Irish girls win the Google Science Fair with an approach to bacteria-enhanced crop growth

    Two versions of “Oklahoma” at Bookworm, with discussion

    10 Disney cartoons from the 1930s, with link to an article on the evolution of Disney’s cartoons over several decades

    The lost art of political persuasion.  This piece at Ricochet argues that politicians are now less about converting the opposition and persuading the undecided, and more about activating those who are already members of their choir.

    Bill Whittle thinks it’s time to talk about some good news (video)

    A recent study suggests that empathy can lead to scapegoating

    Book giveaways during WWII contributed greatly to the popularization of reading and the subsequent growth of the publishing industry.

    This article by a Wharton professor argues that “emotional intelligence is overrated” and, specifically, that it is overrated in sales.  He cites a study in which hundreds of sales people were tested both for emotional intelligence and cognitive ability, and their sales performance subsequently tracked…with the conclusion that cognitive ability was more than 5X as powerful as emotional intelligence in predicting sales performance.  (Actually, I’m pretty sure that the importance of cognitive ability and the importance of emotional intelligence both vary greatly depending on what you’re selling and who you’re selling it to, and also on what kind of resources the salesman needs to leverage within his own organization.)

     

    2 Responses to “Worthwhile Reading & Viewing”

    1. MikeK Says:

      When I was in college, my roommate and I spent a day at the theater in downtown Los Angeles watching Oklahoma and Carousel as a double bill. Each is about 4 hours and we were there all day. Time well spent. He was a music major and has had a successful career as a musician. I just liked both movies.

      Oklahoma opened on Broadway in 1944 and was a sign that everyone had decided the war was won.

    2. Gringo Says:

      Book giveaways during WWII contributed greatly to the popularization of reading and the subsequent growth of the publishing industry.
      A similar tobacco giveaway during WWII had a similar effect.

      http://www.sptimes.com/2004/02/29/Worldandnation/_Troops__tobacco__A_h.shtml